The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.
–Ellen Parr

Growing up in rural Wisconsin, I was used to the quiet and dark. No light or sound pollution to disturb my stargazing, my sleep. No buildings to obstruct the view of the horizon. Wide open spaces.

As a child I had an unquenchable curiosity. My boredom was chased away with imagination. I often traveled to lands I’d only read or heard about, images transporting me there in an instant.

My daydreams and nighttime dreams blurred. The places I traveled during my waking hours were my dreamscapes. As a lucid dreamer I chose my own adventures, the possibilities endless, my powers limitless.

Considering my dreaming past and looking back at the first few months of my awakening, I see now that it was not that far of a stretch to cross the threshold into what until that moment had been the unknown, or what Einstein once called “spooky action at a distance.”

Did you know? In 1905 Einstein, emerging out of a dreamstate had in mind his special relativity theory? An incredible breakthrough having come seemingly out of nowhere.

And so, similarly, it came about for me: a persistent and ever-growing awareness of forces that had always been present but not yet perceived. The puzzle pieces fell into place.

At the time of my realization, Margaret Mead’s words echoed in my head:

“Instead of a world in which scientists, who have been by definition unbelievers in all that the great religions have ever claimed, are divided by a deep unbridgeable gulf from blind believers, who insistently reject all that science has learned, we are in the process of discovering a middle ground… Today… we can ‘look’ at the land surface of Mars; we can ‘see’ with the radio telescope unimagined distances in the universe. And on this growing edge of knowledge, scientists… will give us… new insight into the powers attributed to clairvoyants, to those who have the power to ‘see’ auras… to dream or visualize events outside the bounds of time.” — “On the Edge of the Unknown” Aspects of the Present

For a child who gobbled up the history of space exploration, a teenager who continually added to her personal map of the universe by paging through the ever-updated atlases, thanks to the likes of Hubble and Chandra, and the adult who became familiar with what filled space, images taken by probes and rovers that landed on moons, asteroids and planets, it only made sense that my dreams would lead me to space travel.

And once Pandora’s Box was opened with those dream voyages, other senses started to be awakened. I started to receive transmissions. I started hearing an inner voice, or should I say voices… What I would later find out were to be my teammates. Before our first missions, we had all shared dreamspace together; lucidly working through logistics together, having worked through problem solving by trial and error — all within the comforts of headspace. Little did we know how much our telepathic connections would aid in our separate voyages to the far reaches of space. How dreaming changed everything.